By Ben Kalb

Beyond Spoken Words: The Depth of Accuracy

Quality captions don’t just get the words right, they express every sound and nuance that’s happening on screen. This belief is more than a commitment to showing integrity in our work—it’s a matter of upholding basic, necessary accuracy.

By Ben Kalb

The FCC Cracks Down on Quality Standards

Discount companies are using shortcuts and claim high accuracy at low costs, which sounds pretty good, right? But the FCC isn’t looking for “pretty good”—it’s mandating perfection.

By Ben Kalb

The Tax and SEO Benefits of Closed Captioning

Who would’ve guessed that tax benefits and SEO go together? It’s true for closed captioning. Not only does closed captioning provide accessibility to and benefit a broader audience, but there are several benefits to your business as well—two of which are tax credits and SEO.

By Derek Nicol

The First Deaf Hero in Closed Captioning History

If closed captioning could salute its pioneer, Emerson Romero would be the man. He was a Charlie Chaplain impersonator, an actor for silent movies, and the first to champion accessible media. The best part—he was deaf.

By Ryan Hawthorne

FCC Captioning Quality Improvements

The FCC unanimously voted to adopt new standards for closed captioning on television programming. The new rules are meant to ensure the best efforts of video programming distributors to improve closed captioning quality. The new standards focus on quality improvement to post-produced closed captioning in four specific areas: accuracy, synchronicity, completeness and placement.

By Ben Kalb

FCC Sets Deadlines For Internet Captioning

Another important milestone to providing accessibility over the Internet has been reached. In October 2010, President Obama signed the 21st Century Communications and Video Accessibility Act (CVAA) into law. Among the things it required was closed captioning for video programming delivered over the Internet.​

By Ryan Hawthorne

Live Event Captioning

The conversation surrounding closed captions has traditionally focused on the television set and, more recently, even around Internet based video services. What is often overlooked, though, is the great need for accessibility at live entertainment events.

By Ben Kalb

Ask Your Tax Man

It’s been said that “only two things are certain in life — death and taxes”. Although this is a funny little saying, it also seems very true, doesn’t it? Well, here’s a little tip that may save your small business some money. If you have closed captioned programming, you may be eligible to receive a tax credit for providing accessibility to persons with disabilities. It’s called the Disabled Access Credit and is reported on IRS form 8826.

By Ben Kalb

Who Is Required To Close-Caption?

With only a few exceptions, all programming for broadcast in the United States must be closed captioned. The rules for the requirement of closed captions were directed by the U.S. Congress in the Telecommunications Act of 1996 and became effective starting in 1998. Since then, the required amount of captioning has been steadily increasing. Today, nearly 100% of all English and Spanish language programming is closed captioned.


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