By Ben Kalb

Get the Highest Social Media Engagement with Captions

Have you noticed the trend lately? Social media feeds are no longer showing just simple text or images. Now we’re seeing social media platforms shift quickly and favorably toward video. So why is this shift happening? Because the social giants know users are engaging with video more often than plain text or images…

By Ben Kalb

Closed Captions – Not Just for the Hearing Impaired

Closed captioning adds value, whether an audience is hearing impaired or not. With the increase of films distributed globally, closed captioning will play an important role in reaching audiences who previously would have trouble understanding the original content.

By Ben Kalb

Reaching Your Target Audience – Why Closed Captioning is Important

The accuracy of closed captioning is important. It affects nearly 40 million Americans who are hard of hearing or functionally deaf.

Next time you’re at the gym watching the TV scroll closed captioning, notice how many times “there” should be “their.” What about homophones like carat, caret and carrot? We’ve all seen the viral videos of closed captioning gone wrong, but if you’re deaf or hard of hearing, it’s not very amusing at all.

By Derek Nicol

The First Deaf Hero in Closed Captioning History

If closed captioning could salute its pioneer, Emerson Romero would be the man. He was a Charlie Chaplain impersonator, an actor for silent movies, and the first to champion accessible media. The best part—he was deaf.

By Ben Kalb

Understanding Captions (and Their Place)

Almost everyone has used captions at one time or another, whether they are hearing impaired or not. Think about it – how many times have you read captions in a restaurant or at the gym? Closed captions are used everywhere.

By Ben Kalb

Ask Your Tax Man

It’s been said that “only two things are certain in life — death and taxes”. Although this is a funny little saying, it also seems very true, doesn’t it? Well, here’s a little tip that may save your small business some money. If you have closed captioned programming, you may be eligible to receive a tax credit for providing accessibility to persons with disabilities. It’s called the Disabled Access Credit and is reported on IRS form 8826.

By Ben Kalb

Who Is Required To Close-Caption?

With only a few exceptions, all programming for broadcast in the United States must be closed captioned. The rules for the requirement of closed captions were directed by the U.S. Congress in the Telecommunications Act of 1996 and became effective starting in 1998. Since then, the required amount of captioning has been steadily increasing. Today, nearly 100% of all English and Spanish language programming is closed captioned.


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